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Sprayer to apply beneficial nematodes

Beneficial Insects, Part III

Sprayer to apply nematodes

Garden Superheroes: Beneficial Nematodes

Our series on beneficial superheroes continues. First it was ladybugs and
lacewings
as controls for smaller, soft-bodied insect pests. Then it was on to mantids, those bigger beneficial insects that can take on the bigger insect pests, including caterpillars and grasshoppers. The next superhero may not be an insect, but it is a pest control star that deserves top billing. Who is our caped crusader? Beneficial nematodes, of course!

Bring in a sample or picture of the insect or the damage you are seeing. Our gurus are here to help you find the right superhero.
Beneficial nematodes are superheroes that take on soil-dwelling pests before they cause damage. And, they'll hunt down the pests that overwinter in mulch. They are are completely safe for us, our pets, children, the water, beneficial insects, the environment and anything else we can think of. And they're FAST, with results in as little as 48 hours.
Beneficial nematodes are microscopic worms that seek out and destroy pest insects (these are not the same as nematodes that harm plants) like flea larvae, gypsy moth larvae, cutworms, white grubs, fungus gnat larvae and hundreds more.

Our nurseries have nematodes available. They are kept in a refrigerator where it is dark and cool, so they stay inactive until you release them. Each container treats up to 2,000 square feet, has 7,000 beneficial nematodes, and will target over 230 pests.

As with all garden superheroes, conditions and timing of release is important. The ground cannot be frozen. Beneficial nematodes must be released when it is dark and cool, as light and heat kill them. They can be released as a soil drench, or sprayed. The soil has to be moist, and stay moist for about two weeks. A second application about two weeks after the first will enhance control.
Beneficial Nematodes
An organic solution for the eradication of 230 different insects that live in the soil. Safe and easy to apply.
Beneficial Nematodes
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