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Pink-Flowering Hydrangea

Hydrangeas

Pink hydrangeas in large terra cotta pot

Happy, Healthy Hydrangeas

What’s not to love about hydrangeas? This popular deciduous shrub can range in size from small to large, bearing blooms that are diverse in form and color—from lacecap to multi-colored flowers and even reblooming varieties—in beautiful palettes of pink, purple, blue, lime, red, white, and more.
Hydrangea 'Let's Dance Blue Jangles'
Planting Tips
  • Plant with E.B. Stone’s™ Azalea, Camellia & Acid Planting Mix or add as a soil amendment—perfect for these acid-loving plants.
  • Hydrangeas need some sun each day—they look and flower best with at least four hours of sun (preferably morning sun—no late afternoon sun).
  • Provide plenty of water, especially as they are getting established. Hydrangeas have shallow roots, so they dry out quickly. A layer of shredded bark mulch is a useful addition to any hydrangea planting. Note: hydrangeas do not tolerate wet feet, so let the water drain between waterings.
  • To change the color of your hydrangea flowers, feed them in the fall with an amendment that alters pH. Try GreenAll® True Blue for blue, and E.B. Stone™ Naturals Agricultural Lime to go pink.
Hydrangea 'Let's Dance Blue Jangles'
Hydrangea 'Limelight'
Pruning Tips
Knowing whether your hydrangea blooms on old or new growth will help you to make timely pruning for bigger, better blooms.
  • Prune Bigleaf and Oakleaf hydrangeas after they've finished blooming, but no later than mid-August. They bloom on old wood, and if you prune them late in the year, it may be at the expense of next year’s flowers. These are not the hydrangeas to cut to the ground in late fall.
  • Prune Panicle and Smooth hydrangeas at any time, other than when the buds are opening. They bloom on new wood–from mid-summer to first frost. In late winter or early spring you can cut to about 18”-24” to preserve the shape and to get larger blooms.
  • Read on: Pruning Hydrangeas: Do or Don't?
Hydrangea 'Limelight'
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