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Winter root veggies

Fall Veggie Garden

Fresh veggies starts on table in nursery with pumpkins in background

October In The Veggie Garden

We're a few weeks into the fall veggie garden season, and you might be seeing some growth on those cool-season veggies you planted by seed or put in by plant. Now's the time to take a closer look to make sure they are doing well. We have some advice on thinning, fertilizing, and adjusting irrigation to meet the growing root zones.

Thinning

The seeds you planted were so tiny. The plants you brought home were so little. And now everything is starting to really grow and may need thinning. Think about what size the mature plant should be, and remove enough of the plants or seedlings that they can grow to full size without touching.

Thinning is particularly important for root veggies. If they are planted too close together, they will be in competition and won’t reach full size.

To thin, simply cut the plants you need to remove. All the roots mix together in the soil, and if you pull you will pull out the roots of the plant you want to keep. Cutting is the ideal method for thinning.

Fertilizing

After your seeds have sprouted or your plant starts have grown, it's time to add some fertilizer. We recommend our E.B. Stone™ Organics Tomato & Vegetable Food for superior growth of greens and roots. Your plants will love it, and reward you with healthy growth.

Watering

This is also the time to update how you are watering your cool-season veggies. At first, watering was frequent and shallow to match shallow root zones. As the plants get taller, their roots get deeper, so it's time to leave the water on for longer periods of time. As the root zones get deeper, irrigate less often, allowing the soil to dry out a bit before watering again. Just remember to water slowly, longer, and less often.

Planting Inspiration

There are so many cool-season veggies that may be planted even now. If you have the room, take a look at our Vegetable Planting Calendar for more herbs and greens to fill your garden. For fun, consider some pansies—colorful and perfect for cool-season planting!
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